Ten Of The Best Video Game Movies – Ever

Video Game Movies

The status of video games as high art has been growing in recent years. The incredible world of Skyrim comfortably rivals J.R.R. Tolkein’s Middle Earth in immersive magic and the emotional weight of The Last Of Us’s paternal narrative is equal to most big budget dramas on the big screen.

However, despite the confirmed aesthetic and emotional power of the latest blockbuster video games, movie-adaptations-of-games as an art form has never quite managed to establish itself. Where comic book adaptations may offer a recipe for blockbuster success, video games are, shall we say, a little more hit and miss. That being said, there’s something eternally charming about following our favourite cult game characters in movie form. Whether it’s the chilling horror of Silent Hill or the kitschy gambol of “Detective” Pikachu, what makes video game movies a success isn’t its box office haul or rating on Rotten Tomatoes, it’s the ability to entertain us again and again.

In this article, I have come up with the ten best video game movies. Let’s take a look at them now.

10) Street Fighter (1994)

Street Fighter Video Game MoviesVideo game movie madness continued in 1994 with the screen adaption of Street Fighter. Without a whole load of plot to develop, it’s clear Street Fighter’s production team had a whole load of fun bringing the game’s colourful characters to life. A hilarious and campy cast including Jean-Claude Van Damme, Raul Julia and Kylie Minogue help Street Fighter exist as a snapshot of the early ‘90s.

9) Super Mario Bros (1993)

Super Mario Bros movieBack to where it all began. When Super Mario Bros graced our screens back in 1993 it may have been the first attempt at adapting the video game and where better to begin than with Nintendo’s famous mushroom-hopping, pipe-jumping plumping duo. This weird and wonderful adventure comedy is entertaining from start to end, and with a fantastic turn as arch-villain Dennis Hopper as the cold-blooded President Koopa. 

8) Doom (2005)

Doom Video Game MoviesOn Doom’s release in 1993 it helped to define the First Person Shooter genre so the movie was bound to cause a stir. Doom’s 2005 action-horror adaptation is a gun-toting action-packed affair, with a nod to its origins with FPS perspective sections. Doomed as it may have been at the box office, its two ultra-charismatic male leads Karl Urban and the Rock as an evil supervillain make Doom an enjoyable rewatch. 

7) Silent Hill (2006)

Silent Hill movieCapturing the chilling misty atmosphere of its video game namesake was always going to be a big ask since Silent Hill the game has been lauded as one of the greatest of all time. In its big screen adaptation it manages to be a pretty decent horror film in its own right, which is all you can really ask for. With some truly scary adaptations of the game’s characters, Silent Hill is creepy and watchable, sure to please fans of the game and spooky enough to get you behind the sofa.

6) Resident Evil (2002)

Resident Evil Video Game MoviesThe first of the five Resident Evil movies and also the finest, Paul W.S. Anderson’s return to the genre (he directed Mortal Kombat in 1995) puts a little more attention on plotline in the dystopian world of Resident Evil. Milla Jovovich’s Alice takes a little over half the movie to discover her in-built martial arts prowess and combat the evil Umbrella Corp., but it’s worth the wait for the dramatic fight scenes that follow.

5)  Mortal Kombat (1995)

Mortal Kombat moviePure cheesy action makes Paul W.S. Anderson’s 1995 adaptation of Mortal Kombat a classic example of the video game turned movie. Like the button-mashing version of a movie, this unselfconscious ass-kicker takes the colourful characters of the game and squares them up for a battle to determine the fate of the world. Improved by its painfully comedic script, Mortal Kombat was a “flawless victory”.

4) Rampage (2018)

Rampage movieDwayne Johnson returns to fine video game form in Rampage, the larger-than-life adaptation of the ‘80s arcade game of the same name. One giant crocodile, one giant gorilla, one giant wolf and one giant man are the ingredients in this recipe for brainless action. This button-mashing madness that doesn’t take itself too seriously and that’s what we love in a video game movie.

3) Tomb Raider (2018)

Tomb Raider Video Game MoviesAll credit to Angela Jolie’s original on-screen Lara Croft, the 2018 reboot of the series managed that rare feat for a video game movie – to be an independently credible watch. A predictable plot line aside, Tomb Raider was a big-budget affair with massively enjoyable action sequences. Alicia Vikander received well-earned praise for her grittily real Lara, whose combination of vulnerability and strength brought surprising depth to character. 

2) Sonic The Hedgehog (2020)

Sonic The HedgehogSonic’s turn on the big screen is the most recent addition to the lofty genre of video game movies. A live action conception of this classic game gives us the brilliantly over the top supervillainy of Doctor Robotnik played by Jim Carrey, whilst James Marsden brings charisma and character to Sonic’s sheriff sidekick. Heartfelt and genuinely funny, Sonic is an action adventure film that’ll please kids and parents alike, as well as anyone with fond memories of playing the anthropomorphic blue hedgehog himself.

1) Detective Pikachu (2019)

Detective Pikachu movieSince 1998 a whole series of animated Pokémon movies have hit our screens without making too much of a splash – who knew all it would take to create one of the greatest video game movies of all time was a neo-noir adaptation and Ryan Reynolds’s wry take on the cuddliest Pokémon out there. With an all new plot line set in every 90’s kids favourite universe Detective Pikachu was a smash hit – bring on the sequel!

With contemporary offerings of Sonic, The Hedgehog and Detective Pikachu bringing some big-budget CGI and witty screenwriting to the video game movie, I’d say the future looks bright. Video games characters have established themselves such cult status that it’s often truly a delight to see the madcap characters taken to the big screen. These ten offerings are sure to amuse, delight and even occasionally thrill.

 

 

About author: Beatrix Potter is a writer at Personal Statement Help and is also involved in many business projects with small and start-up companies. She enjoys identifying and finding solutions for project problems, and her goal is to improve the effectiveness of our communication.

How to Make a Successful Five Nights at Freddy’s Movie

With the recent announcement of both Five Nights at Freddy’s 4 coming out this August and a movie in the works, it is a great time to discuss this rapidly growing series. It seems as if every couple of months, creator Scott Cawthon has been releasing these short, stressful games appeasing fans and theorists alike. While these roughly two hour long experiences work as games, is it possible for it to translate well to a film?

According to history, the answer is “no” for the simple fact that there hasn’t been a good video game to movie adaption yet. However, this game has such an interesting lore and simplicity to it that it could be the first good video game movie.

So, how can it be good? Well, here are some ideas:

  1. Make it a Straight Horror Movie but with Comedic Elements
  2. Set it in the Early 90’s
  3. Shoot it in an Abandoned Chuck E. Cheese
  4. Follow the Source Material, but Interpret it in Your Own Way
  5. Keep the Budget Low and Fast Track the Film

The set up of Five Nights at Freddy’s is very simple, which is part of what makes it so good and what will make or break this franchise as a movie. A key to making this work as a movie, is to make the tone a serious horror movie but with comedic elements sprinkled throughout the flick. The set up of haunted animatronics is so silly, it would be weird for there to be absolutely no humor in the movie. However, most of my friends (including me) were scared of the Chuck E. Cheese animatronics growing up, so the humor should be used sporadically in order to keep a consistent tone. To bring the authenticity of the horror, the movie should also be shot in an abandoned Chuck E. Cheese and have the movie be set in the early 1990’s, much like the first game was. That may sound difficult, but from a production standpoint  it’s actually not. Shooting in an old Chuck E. Cheese would actually save the production some money since they wouldn’t have to build a set. Even now, productions use abandoned or closing establishments to save money. In fact, recently filmmaker Kevin Smith made a deal to shoot his latest movie, Mallbrats, the sequel to Mallrats, inside a mall that is about to close. Timing is everything when it comes to this, so the hardest part of shooting in an abandoned or closing Chuck E. Cheese is actually finding one.

The last two points I made kind of go hand-in-hand considering these steps would have to be taken care of in pre-production. The writer of the movie should definitely follow some of the main stories and themes that were presented in the series of games. However, as anyone who actually played the games will tell you, the lore of the series runs deep and is highly up to the players interpretation. Because of this, the writer should play through the first game and interpret it his or her own way to form the story. To be honest, I’ll be disappointed if the movie turns out to be using mostly fan theories, and if that’s the way it is done, the movie viewers and fans of the games will find the movie to be too predictable. Another danger writing-wise is that the series’ creator, Scott Cawthon, is involved with the production. The writer should listen to what he has to say about the story but also remember that Cawthon is a genius game developer, but that doesn’t necessarily make him a great storyteller or writer. It will be a very dangerous line to walk when scripting this flick.

My last point is that this movie shouldn’t cost too much to make. The franchise name will be marketable enough, so no big-named actors really need to be put in this movie from a marketing perspective. The budget of this movie could easily be made for around 5 million dollars with an additional 1-3 million for marketing. As long as a good chunk of the budget goes to building the animatronics, this movie will have money to spare by the end of production. Oren Peli would make a great director for this project considering he knows how to make a low budget horror movie into one of the biggest franchises in the world, like what he did with Paranormal Activity back in 2009. Regardless of what you think about Paranormal Activity, it’s hard to argue that the first movie, which was the only one directed by Peli, is a well-shot and well-paced movie that was made on an insanely small budget and was an astounding success.

With the budget being low, this movie should also be fast tracked. The movie should come out when the game is still popular and in the zeitgeist of pop culture. With the fourth game in the series coming out this August and supposedly being the last game in the series, the movie is getting closer to not being able to strike while the iron’s hot. For maximum profit, this movie should be released anytime between April and October 2016 before people stop caring about Five Nights at Freddy’s as a series.

This movie has the potential to be the first good video game to movie adaption, it’s now just a matter of if the filmmakers care enough to ensure quality rather than making this a simple cash grab.