EarthBound Inspiration

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I know I shouldn’t be, but I’m kind of embarrassed to admit that my love of storytelling didn’t come from literature, or even film. Not originally, anyhow. It came from video games.

It bothers me to no end that I have to defend games as a medium. Truthfully, I don’t even like to call them games. I’d sooner call them interactive media or the like, but that just makes me sound like I’m calling porn “adult entertainment.”

I could go on forever about the medium. But I’m here to talk about one game in particular, and how it influenced me growing up.

It was called EarthBound

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Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14086391369/

A cult RPG on the Super Nintendo about a thirteen-year-old kid in contemporary America (called “Eagleland” in the game) alongside his best friends, saving the world from cosmic horrors. It’s one of the goofiest, trippiest games to come out of Japan at the time, and that’s saying something.

In a time when most RPGs were sword-and-sorcery fantasy, along comes this game where the hero uses yo-yos and baseball bats, orders pizza from payphones to heal, uses the ATM to get money, sleeps in hotels, travels via buses and bicycles, gets homesick, goes backstage of concerts, and fights hippies, taxicabs, pedophiles, ramblin’ mushrooms, wild ducks, possessed tents, and more. All done to a jazzy, ‘60s-’70s Western pop music inspired soundtrack. You can practically sing the Beatles lyrics along with some of the game’s soundtrack.

All this plus themes of courage and friendship and adventure. It was about leaving home and seeing the world–and not your usual fare of dark forests and magic castles, but of suburbia and big cities and wintery private schools and beachside vacation destinations. Ness, the hero, came from a small house in a suburb with his family. He had a baseball cap and a scruffy dog. He was me. And he had best friends that he saw the world with. This was my On the Road in the 1990s.

EarthBound was the first game that I’d played that was so chock-full of text that I might as well have been reading a pile of books

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Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14273041415/

It had a quirky, but heartfelt story that I fell in love with. And from then on, I needed my games to draw me in with the story and the setting and the characters–a fact that continues to this day. “Fun” is secondary to aesthetic and narrative. I want art and I want story. Games got me drawing and they got me reading and they inspired me to create my own stories.

When I was in grade, oh, four or five, I did one of those reading evaluation things that teachers give you. They told me I read on a college-grade level. I was a quiet kid who had little use for books, but I read more than most book-lovers. After all, the games I loved were filled with words, back before everything was voice-acted. My reading skills came from games.

And EarthBound was the start

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Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14273039595/

It made me want to run away and have adventures. To write screenplays about psychics and mad scientists and aliens invading the suburbs. I wanted to build a house in the woods and listen to the Beatles on the radio all day long. I can think of so many beautiful, iconic moments in this goofy kids’ game that I could make this post go on and on and on.

Ultimately, EarthBound gave my mind a fictional wanderlust. Even though it was a game, it made me appreciate the beauty of the world outside my house. I look at the stars or smell the earth after it rains and I remember this dreamy feeling of wanting to put on my trusty baseball cap, leave home and save the world. Games like EarthBound provided this imaginary escape–the same kind books like Huckleberry Finn would do for readers. It was freedom. And that freedom is why I play games.

Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor was More, and Less, than Meets the Eye (of Sauron)

Shadow of Mordor

Middle-Earth: Shadow of Mordor was an arcade-style beat-‘em-up in the guise of an open-world adventure game.

The 2014 game, which will be getting a sequel soon, boasted the unique “Nemesis System”, which allowed the game’s orcs to have power struggles, comment on the player’s previous actions, and allow for personalized game experiences.

With the Nemesis System, orcs levelled up with the player. They began at the bottom of the food chain, and as the player advanced time (usually through death), the orcs would beat each other up to gain status and new abilities. If the player were to be killed by an orc and fight them again later, the orc might say, “Didn’t I already kill you?” Or if the player “killed” an orc in a particular battle, the supposedly-dead orc might reappear with a scar or burn mark, ready to take revenge.

Nobody stayed dead in that game, apparently. I mean, the protagonist dies at the beginning. But it’s okay because he’s got a ghost possessing him? But the ghost is an elf? I don’t really remember the details. Anyway.

It was a well-praised system that ultimately acted as window dressing for killing scores of orcs, which, in most games of this type, would all look exactly the same. Shadow of Mordor’s Nemesis System gave personality and history to the orcs and their respective clans, driving the player to more meaningful encounters.

Here’s the thing. Shadow of Mordor wasn’t a very deep game.

It had a beautiful, if mostly bland, open world, and some requisite collectibles scattered around. It had some fun with the Lord of the Rings universe, but never reached the heights of the books. It didn’t have a smorgasbord of minigames or filler quests, like an Assassin’s Creed. And it didn’t have a huge cast of fun characters, like the Arkham Games.

If it were a book genre, it would be sword and sorcery, rather than high fantasy. And as a game, I’d sooner call it an arcadey action game rather than an epic adventure game. And that’s great.

Shadow of Mordor came out at the very end of September, 2014. The previous big game was Destiny, which came out at the very beginning of the month. And the next major release wouldn’t be until November, when all the typical AAA releases came out. In short, it was a fairly dry time of the year (assuming you wanted a break from Destiny). Shadow of Mordor was a snack between big meals.

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Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/15939671592/

And I think there’s a market for that.

A “good enough” game, released in a slow season, to tide players over until the full-course AAAs can come out to play. Shadow of Mordor was a tight game, with fun action, that didn’t try to be more than it needed to.

Not every game needs world-ending stakes and gigantic set pieces and NPCs with filler quests to pad out the game length. I preferred the lean focus of Shadow of Mordor over the bloated Arkham Knight and the stretched-too-thin Assassin’s Creed: Unity. And I could still enjoy the open adventure format that games like Bayonetta didn’t deliver.

With all this said, I’m open for a bigger and better version of this game with Middle-Earth: Shadow of War. Maybe it’ll be the Assassin’s Creed 2 to Shadow Mordor’s Assassin’s Creed 1. Or it’ll just be more arcadey orc-killin’, which would be fine with me. I just really, really hate orcs. Maybe I should talk to someone about that…

Hearthstone Guide: Defeating The Crone

The opera house has plenty of unique new challenges for the One Night in Karazhan adventure with its grand finale being a battle with the Wizard of Oz homage, The Crone.  Much like the fight with Emperor Thaurissan in Blackrock Mountain, The Crone’s hero power can kill you in one shot and the only thing stopping it is the survival of a specific minion.  In this case, it’s Dorothee who will stand on your side of the board and offer buffs to your minions.  All minions to the left of Dorothee will gain charge and all to her right will gain taunt.  These effects will immediately make almost any deck incredibly powerful and this will be one of the easier bosses on normal difficulty.

One quick route to victory is to simply build a deck of all your best taunt minions, place them all to the left of Dorothee, and just go for the face.  Only trade when it’s absolutely necessary to protect Dorothee and be sure to have a range of minions rather than simply going for a zoo deck as that can leave you vulnerable to the Abominations that The Crone has.  Keep in mind that The Crone has plenty of buffs like Blessing of Kings and Power of the Wild, so be prepared for those types of bursts.  Also, remember to change your deck for the encounter to Wild as all cards are legal against the bosses.

On heroic difficulty, things get a lot trickier as The Crone not only has 50 health, but is also putting you on an eight-turn timer.  On turn eight, The Crone is guaranteed to draw Twisting Nether and will use it for a  guaranteed kill on Dorothee and, by extension, you.  I played several matches to test it and she topdecked the card every time without fail.  It’s possible to buy yourself an extra turn with Loatheb or Counterspell, but the fact remains that you need to be able to bring The Crone down fast.

One of your best bets for bringing down the wicked witch is to build a Warlock deck with a focus on strong stat lines for low costs.  Cards like Duskboar and Ancient Watcher are generally what you’re going to want to focus on.  What makes Warlock particularly potent is that it has minions like Flame Imp, Wrathguard, and Pit Lord that trade your health for powerful stats.  Since the crone is going to focus exclusively on attacking Dorothee, so your own health is irrelevant.  Warlock also has plenty of sticky minions like Imp Master and Possessed Villager that provide plenty of protection.

Another potent tactic is to play Priest and cast Inner Fire on Dorothee.  You’ll still need plenty of minions with strong stats to keep her safe, such as the neutral ones mentioned earlier.  You’ll also want card draw as your strategy will be built entirely around this one spell and you’ll struggle without it.  However, you do have unlimited attempts at the boss, so just keep trying until you get lucky.

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There are all the tactics you’ll need to turn The Crone into a green puddle.  Maybe you’ll catch her in a charitable mood and she’ll spend her buffs on your minions.  Seriously, the above image is just one of three separate occasions where she just gave me the match for no real reason.  Hearthstone A.I. is just the best.

New Syberia 3 Screenshots Reveal the Youkol camp and Steiner’s workshop

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I grew up playing the first two games in the Syberia series and loving them like crazy. Syberia was indeed one of those games that made you care or even more – LOVE – your characters and the relations between them, even though one of the main protagonists was a robot! You rarely get something as deep as that and this is the reason why I am absolutely hyped about Syberia 3. And I believe you should be too!

Microids has just released a bunch of new screenshots for Benoit Sokal’s upcoming adventure and, from the looks of it, we’re talking about a game that stays true to the previous two entries in the series and which apparently has everything that you need for a flawless, emotional adventure.

You can check out the new screenshots below:

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In Syberia 3, the story begins when Kate is discovered dying on a riverbank by the Youkol tribe, nomadic people migrating with their snow ostriches. Stuck in Valsembor village, together, they must find a way to continue their journey, in a high-speed chase against their enemies and unexpected obstacles, not to mention Kate’s past, which catches up with her…

The game is set to launch on December 1st for PC, Mac, PS4 and Xbox One and you can’t go wrong if you consider it a must purchase – even if traditional adventure games are not your main thing. You will love this one!

New Hearthstone Adventure, One Night in Karazhan, Revealed

During a special event held at ChinaJoy expo and streamed through the official Hearthstone Twitch channel, Blizzard revealed the next expansion for their popular digital card game.  The new expansion, One Night in Karazhan, will be an adventure based around the home of the Guardian Medivh back in its glory days.  Medivh is setting up for the greatest party in the history of Azeroth and he’s going to need help getting the place in order before the festivities begin.

Like previous adventures, it will have players take on a number of single-player boss battles to win new cards for their collections.  The journey will be spread across four wings with three bosses each.  The first step is the dining hall where you’ll have to take on a golem made of dinnerware and play a Hearthstone-version of chess.  Next is the opera house with plays based on Romeo & Juliet, The Big Bad Wolf, and The Wizard of Oz.  The menagerie comes third with a stampede of beasts running wild and fiends like the satyr Terestian Illhoof leading the charge.  Your final stop is Medivh’s private quarters where mythical opponents like the dragon Netherspite and the terrifying Shade of Aran will put you to the ultimate test.  Before any of that, however, all players will be given a single, free prologue mission the will award them with two new cards.

New cards that have been revealed for the expansion include the Ivory Knight, a Paladin minion that discovers a spell, Kindly Grandmother, a Hunter minion that summons the Big Bad Wolf upon death, and the legendary Curator that draws a beast, dragon, and murloc from your deck.  More cards will be revealed over time as we draw closer to release.

One Night in Karazhan is set to release its first wing on August 11th.  Are you looking forward to this funky interpretation of the famous tower?  What new decks are you planning to build with these new cards?  Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

The League of Explorers Announced for Hearthstone, Launching Next Week

With how much The Grand Tournament expansion resembled the Argent Tournament event from World of Warcraft, everyone was expecting the next Hearthstone adventure to be based on Icecrown Citadel and the battle against Lich King Arthas.  Instead, players will be joining up with the famous Brann Bronzebeard and his Explorer’s League to trek through the untamed wilds of Azeroth in search of ancient treasures.  The League of Explorers promises a wide variety of PvE challenges as players journey to various exotic locations with the titular explorers coaching them all the way.

For the explorers, there is obviously the prestigious dwarf Brann Bronzebeard of the regal Bronzebeard brothers.  Brann is one of Azeroth’s greatest explorers and archaeologists and has done his fair share to save the world in various major events in World of Warcraft.  Joining him on this new quest are three new explorers being introduced with the expansion.  There’s the genius night elf Elise Starseeker, the brash human Reno Jackson, and the dignified murloc Sir Finley Mrrgglton.  Of course, these renowned adventures will be joining your collection of cards as new legendaries, such as Elise Starseeker being a 4 mana 3/5 that adds the Map to the Golden Monkey card to your deck.  Map to the Golden Monkey is a 2 mana spell that draws a card and adds the Golden Monkey to your deck.  Once you finally get the Golden Monkey, it is a 4 mana 6/6 with taunt and the most insane battlecry in the game to date: Replace the cards in your hand and deck with random legendary cards.  While the randomness might not make it a competitive card at the highest levels, especially for any combo deck, it’s certainly not a bad card and will be a must-have for any joke deck.

There are plenty of other cards to obtain in the new adventure, such as the new Hunter spell Explorer’s Hat.  For 2 mana, you can give a minion +1/+1 and a deathrattle effect that adds another Explorer’s Hat to your hand.  It sounds like a great deal, but that 2 mana can be a serious toll on your tempo given how little impact it makes on the board.  It will certainly be a good card for control decks, but it looks too slow to improve aggro decks.  The expansion will also add a new keyword into the game called ‘discover’, which generates three random cards following a certain condition and lets you select one to add to your hand.  For example, the Jeweled Scarab is a 1/1 beast for 2 mana that discovers a 3 mana card.  These cards aren’t taken from your deck, but can be any neutral card or any minion or spell from your class.

There are plenty more cards being spotted at demonstrations during Blizzcon, such as Brann himself being a 3 mana 2/4 that causes your battlecries to trigger twice and a new Paladin secret called Sacred Trial that destroys a minion played by your opponent if they already have three or more minions on the board.  Amazingly, The League of Explorers is right around the corner with the first wing releasing next Thursday.  What are your thoughts on Hearthstone‘s latest adventure?  Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.

Why Does Hearthstone Have Adventures?

The biggest problem with the most recent adventure-based expansion for Hearthstone, Blackrock Mountain, is that it ultimately did very little to shake up the meta game at large.  Only one new deck really emerged from the expansion, that being the infamous Patron Warrior.  Even the highly-touted dragon synergy that the expansion introduced ended up amounting to very little at the time as there just wasn’t a wide enough variety of cards to make a dragon-focused deck viable.  In contrast, the following, more traditional expansion, The Grand Tournment, added a far wider range of possibilities by virtue of simply adding a whole lot of cards.  It even brought dragon decks to the forefront with just a few additional cards.  This all made me wonder why Hearthstone even has these adventure-based expansions like Curse of Naxxramas and Blackrock Mountain in the first place rather than just going for traditional expansions in the style of Goblins Vs. Gnomes and The Grand Tournament exclusively.  Why put all of this effort into designing all of these boss challenges that players will be done with fairly quickly and only release a fraction of the cards that a traditional expansion would include?  Isn’t that sort of practice just bad for both the players and the developers?  After giving it some thought, I realized that it’s actually quite the opposite.  Not only do Hearthstone adventures offer a great deal of satisfaction for players, but they also provide an invaluable service for the developers.

For the players, there is a great deal of satisfaction to be had in the guarantee for the cards you are going to get out your purchases, especially when it comes to the legendary cards.  While legendaries aren’t necessarily the strongest cards, there is an undeniable sense of gratification that comes with obtaining cards on that highest tier.  Sorting through booster packs is great when you stumble upon something special, but it often leaves you with uninteresting cards.  It’s possible to go through dozens of packs without finding a single legendary and those playing on a budget can go months without adding one to their collection.  For those players, adventures are a major step forward for their collection.  There is also the sense of completion that comes with having all of the cards in the set fairly quickly.  If there is any deck you want to build that calls for those cards, you’ll always know that you have them.  In that sense, adventures are the Hearthstone equivalent of starter decks.  There’s a much smaller card pool than a pack expansion overall, but you are sure to have the entire set.

Along with the cards, players also get to enjoy the unique challenge of the bosses.  While there is little incentive to revisit these bosses after you’ve beaten them, that short time spent with them forces players to examine the game closely in order to find a boss’ weakness.  Highly technical bosses like Garr and Vaelastrasz force players to think outside the box and develop new tactics for the game that they haven’t considered before.  They can also inspire players to attempt similar strategies in constructed play, finding new avenues existing within the game that they never realized before.  After taking on Vaelastrasz, players will likely be in the mood to play around with milling and fatigue-focused decks, especially those who hadn’t known of the concept before.

However, the ones who gain the most from the adventures are the developers.  I don’t just mean that in a financial sense as releasing packs that players have to continuously sort through would net them more sales than wings of an adventure that anyone can grind enough gold for in a week or so per wing.  What the developers truly gain from is the room to experiment with their unique boss fights.  Balance is much less of a concern in PvE than it is in PvP as there is only one side of the fight that really needs to be accounted for.  As such, the bosses can be equipped with all manner of conceptual mechanics.  For example, Chromaggus’ ability to force cards into your hand that work against you until played is a brilliant idea that might be worked into actual cards in later expansions.  Even if the idea never works out for any collectible cards, it doesn’t go completely to waste now that it’s incorporated into this one boss fight.  Adventures are a playground of experimentation where cutting edge ideas can be put into practice rather than be left to sit on the drawing board.

That previous point can be debated with the release of the Tavern Brawl game mode that runs a different challenge every week.  While Tavern Brawl has given Blizzard another avenue to experiment with new concepts, it doesn’t offer the developers quite the same level of freedom as boss fights do.  The brawls are still PvP and, while balance isn’t as important here, there still needs to be a level of equality in place.  You can argue that one deck plays to a brawl’s strengths more, but the developers still strive to keep that gap narrow.  As such, designing conceptual cards is exceedingly more difficult for a brawl than it is for an adventure.  It’s not surprising that only two brawls have introduced conceptual cards so far, those being the Showdown at Blackrock and the Banana Brawl.  Ironically, those are two of the least popular brawls in the series, whereas the most popular brawls are the ones that put an unusual twist on the existing game, such as Too Many Portals and Double Deathrattler.  Tavern Brawl simply isn’t as viable a testing ground for new ideas as boss fights are.

Another way Blizzard can only experiment in Adventures is to introduce cards that rely on one other, specific card.  Feugen and Stalagg each have the ability to summon the mighty Thaddius upon death, but only if the other has already died at some point.  Releasing cards like these in card packs would frustrate players who manage to find one of these extremely rare cards, but now has to find the other one to make either worthwhile.  It wouldn’t be impossible to get away with these cards in packs as several physical TCGs have built themselves around collecting specific cards already.  The Pokemon TCG is built largely around evolving specific Pokemon into other specific Pokemon, while Yu-Gi-Oh has plenty of fusion cards that are useless without their specified components.  However, by releasing these cards as a set in a single adventure, it makes things far more satisfying for the players.  While there may be a precedent with other games, that shouldn’t be an excuse to hold Hearthstone back in its own design.  Bundling these interaction cards together with adventures makes them much more enticing and makes collecting much more enjoyable for players.

Blackrock Mountain may not be the best example of an adventure given how niche many of its cards were, but it should simply serve as a lesson on how future adventures should be focused rather than a signal that the idea itself is flawed.  The key to successful adventure sets lies in focusing on general mechanics for most of the cards, as seen with the more fondly received Naxxramas, rather than attempting to establish new archetypes of their own.  They also need bosses that act as mind-bending puzzles and memorable encounters rather than exploitative tricks.  While I use my Naxxramas cards much more frequently than my Blackrock ones, I vividly remember almost every boss from Blackrock while only having fond memories of a few Naxxramas bosses.  Hopefully, the developers now have a full picture of what does and doesn’t work with adventures and will be able to consistent deliver excellent adventures from here on.

Ultimately, adventures truly are a boon to Hearthstone.  While cards come out slower because of them, they do come out smarter as a result.  The developers are given the freedom to experiment with cards in ways that they can’t anywhere else by testing experimental concepts in boss fights and introducing unique interactions.  Meanwhile, players are given a fulfilling, complete set of cards to add to their collection more easily than digging through card packs in the hopes of finding the cards they’re looking for.  Blizzard simply needs to look at what works best for adventures to improve their future releases and their value towards the game won’t need to be called into question again.

A Request To Developers Regarding In Game Choices

Recently I have been playing through Dreamfall: Chapters, I’ve been having fun and it is serving as a good follow up to Dreamfall: The Longest Journey . There is one thing that I would like to criticise however. Whenever a choice is made in the game regarding another character the game tells me that the other person will remember that, or that this choice will affect the relationship between the two characters, or something else along those lines. Later when the consequence of the choice becomes apparent the game lets me know that my choice has had an impact on the game’s narrative. In all fairness this isn’t a feature unique to Dreamfall: Chapters, I merely use them as an example because it is a game that I am currently playing. The Wolf Among Us was guilty of the same thing.

On the face of it this would seem like a harmless feature but I have to come feel that it is a feature that would best be abandoned because it discourages thinking about the story. When it comes to enjoying a good story part of the fun comes from thinking about it afterwards, wondering what might have happened if characters had acted differently, and why they acted the way they did. This is even more true of games like Dreamfall Chapters, in which the player can guide the narrative and wonder how things may have unfolded differently. When a game sign posts the effect of a choice the effect is to remove all ambiguity. The player no longer has the fun of speculating how their choice has affected the game, they’ve been told explicitly what their choice has resulted in. The player doesn’t need to ponder the the nature of the relationships that unfold with the game as they are given all the answers. This takes away some of the mystery from the story and breaks some of the immersion of the game with its story. Imagine watching a movie, now imagine trying to watch that movie with someone telling you “that was important”, or “that happened because of that thing that happened earlier”. Unless you had turned on the commentary option it would be very annoying.

It also serves to highlight the limits of the game. No game can offer 100% freedom in what you do or how you change the story but a good game can distract from you this and make you feel like you really made a difference. If you know exactly what you did to change it then it highlights the limits of your affect on the story. This ties back to my earlier point. If the game didn’t feel the need to highlight the impact of every choice you made then it would be harder to pin down how the game is different because of your actions and choices. This would result in the game’s plot unfolding in a much more organic fashion that felt like more than the sum of its parts, rather than a series of set choices with a story built around them.

I should stress at this point that experiencing this has never ruined my enjoyment of a game. I raced through The Wolf Among Us because I was so captivated by the story. I am similarly enjoying Dreamfall: Chapters and I do feel like my actions as a player have made a difference. I just wish that the game didn’t feel the need to signpost every decision. Avoiding this feature would, in my opinion lead to a story that felt a lot more natural.

Sometimes a little subtlety goes a long way.

The Walking Dead Game: Season 3 Release Date Announced

Dead Game

The Walking Dead Game: Season 3 has been announced during the San Diego Comic Con in July and I am sure that all the fans of the flawlessly made game were excited to hear this. However, one thing is not clear yet: the release date of The Walking Dead Game: Season 3, and that’s probably due to good reason as development is certainly in its early stages.

However, during the Skybound Entertainment’s 2014 Multimedia Panel at Comic Con, Telltale Games President Kevin Bruner and The Walking Dead creator Robert Kirkman announced that there will be a third season of The Walking Dead game and that it’s coming… later rather than sooner. Here is the quote:

“Will there be a Season 3? Ok… there WILL be a Season 3. Yes, we are going to be making Season 3. — And it’s coming SOON? No, it will be coming LATER. Not this year […] but 2015.”

So, the release date of The Walking Dead Game Season 3 is sometime in 2015. Although we didn’t get a complete release date, I believe that it is safe to say that the title will actually launch in the first quarter of 2015, just like the previous games. My personal guess is that the game will come in February or March, so there’s still a bit of waiting left to do. Until then, you can still replay the first two seasons and enjoy the direction of the game.

PS4 Exclusive Game Without Memory Is a Promising Thriller

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The “console exclusive” battle this generation will be extremely interesting to watch because the console that has the most AND best exclusives has the biggest chances of becoming the winner of the current gen. The PlayStation 4 seems to have an unexpected trick up their sleeve with the interactive thriller Without Memory.

So why “unexpected”? Well, because this game is developed by the virtually unknown Russian studio Dinosaurum Games, and it’s not in the genre you would expect to draw in a lot of attention. It’s not a shooter, it’s not an RPG… it’s not even Flappy Bird! It’s an interactive thriller, which makes us think of revolutionary adventure gaming or at least a visual delight.

And a visual delight we’ll get for sure, as the concept art for Without Memory already looks amazing. And knowing that the game will run on the Unreal Engine 4 makes us be pretty sure that it will deliver the eye candy.

There will definitely be multiple choice for the player to make throughout their adventure, and each choice will influence the direction of the story and hopefully we’ll have some smart writing and difficult decisions to make (think Telltale’s The Walking Dead series). The game also promises “tens of endings” and world class quality. I’m really eager to find out more about this!

Without Memory will be released as a PS4 exclusive sometime in 2016 and actual in-game screenshots are promised to arrive this summer. Until then, you can check out some of the amazing artwork from the game:

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Source: Dual Shockers