Five Nights At Freddy’s 3 Easter Eggs You Probably Missed

Freddy’s

Five Nights At Freddy’s 3 was released last week. If you’ve been following the series, you’ll know developer Scott Cawthorn loves hiding all kinds of hints within the games about the dark past of the Freddy Fazzbear’s Pizza franchise. But who has time to hunt for Easter eggs when you’re flat out just making it through the night alive? Here’s a list of the interesting things you probably missed:

1. Springtrap Boot Images

This might be the creepiest sight Cawthorn has thrown our way so far. Occasionally when you boot the game, one of three images of Springtrap will show up. It seems to be pretty rare, and plenty of players may never get to see them. They appear to show Springtrap removing the head of his suit, revealing what you may assume is the endoskeleton head beneath. But, as we know from the minigames, it’s not an endoskeleton in that suit – it’s the purple man. Which means that head under the suit is actually a decaying corpse. Gross.

2. Random items appearing

Between the fact that the place is haunted and you’re having hallucinations, it’s no surprise the scenery all around you keeps on changing. Some of these include a poster of Springtrap randomly appearing on camera 10, a Shadow Bonnie plush that sometimes appears on your desk, the marionette’s mask in camera 8, Iand a paper plate Bonnie appearing on top of the box of junk. On top of that, although it’s hard to make out because of the static, it looks like Bonnie’s hiding on the left side of camera 6.

3. Shadow Bonnie

You may not remember Shadow Bonnie from FNaF 2, probably because you never actually encountered him. Shadow Bonnie appeared very rarely in your office in the second game, and he’s back again in in the third. He’s hiding out in one of the minigames as a clue for what you have to do to reach the good ending. Which leads us to…

4. The Minigames

There’s actually a LOT to do in the minigames. You probably played through the minigames at the end of each night, but you may not have noticed there’s actually a ton more. They’re all ridiculously difficult to reach because the only hints you’ll have as to how are all hidden in the main minigames. Remember the weird codes that showed up in the hallways, and the shadow bonnie? Those are all clues, and you need to play ALL the minigames to unlock the good ending. Yes, there are multiple endings in this game. Here’s a full guide on getting the good ending.

5. Golden Freddy

Yes, Golden Freddy makes an appearance too. He’s just a hallucination, but he might show up in the left corner of your office. He also occasionally appears in the static of your cameras. Fun fact: you can honk Freddy’s nose on the poster in your office.

6. Mangle

Mangle’s back – also a hallucination. He might appear on your cameras, and if you don’t notice him at first, you will pretty soon as his presence is always followed by loud static noises. He might also poke his little head over the window to your office. Those noises attract Springtrap to your office, so Mangle, as always, is nothing but trouble.

7. Bad Ending Screen

On the bad ending screen, you’ll notice there’s an extra animatronic’s head in the back that doesn’t belong to any of the original characters. It’s not certain who it is, but it’s a pretty safe bet that it’s Springtrap. Interestingly, this head is absent in the good ending screen.

8. The Skull

In the minigames, when you wander to the left you’ll find yourself in the storage room from the original game. You can see a bunch of animatronic parts on the tables, but there’s also what appears to be a human skull. What’s that doing there?

9. The Newspaper

After you beat nightmare mode, a newspaper clip appears showing that the attraction burned down, likely due to faulty wiring. There’s a picture of a Freddy figurine. If you brighten the image, Springtrap appears in the background, indicating he survived the fire. Additionally, the blurred out text on the newspaper is actually Scott Cawthorn telling us about the development of the original game. Here’s what it says:

Looking back on many of my old games, I’ve found that there is almost always a broken-down robot in them. I’m not sure why this seems to be such a recurring theme in my games, but it’s obvious that it’s something haunting me.

Before I began work on FNaF, I had to choose what game to make out of three potential games, knowing it might be my last try before having to start a new career. I was choosing between a sequel to The Desolate Hope, a remake of my first game – Legacy of Flan, or a new idea about animatronics and security cameras.

While working on the first game, I started a crowdfunding campaign for it. I raised exactly zero dollars.

Fun fact: The names Freddy, Bonnie, Chica and Foxy were just nicknames while I worked on the characters. I was planning on giving them official names later but had grown very fond of them by the time the game was done.

In the original game, Freddy was never originally meant to move around the diner and was only meant to “get you” if your time ran out. This was changed before release.

In real life I tend to have waking-nightmares, meaning that I walk in my sleep, etc. One night I dreamt that Bonnie was in the hall outside my door, so I jumped out of bed and rushed to hold the door shut. I discovered that the door was locked and it filled me with dread. In FNaF 1, when the doors don’t work, it means something is already in your office! So when I felt that the door was locked, I felt like bonnie was in my bedroom and was about to get me! Thankfully, I woke up.

I actually modeled the Foxy character on my laptop while riding on a 24hr drive to visit my in-laws over the summer of 2014. It’s very difficult to model a 3D character on a bumpy car ride. Maybe this is why Foxy looks so torn up!

While we were there visiting, my kids got to experience Foxy’s jump-scare for the first time!

How To Get The Good Ending In Five Nights At Freddy’s 3

The last two Five Nights At Freddy’s games were full of well-hidden Easter eggs, and the third game is no exception. Five Nights At Freddy’s 3 contains not only an extensive list of Easter Eggs you’d have to be a god to uncover, but also has multiple endings. Reaching the good ending is no mean feat – you’ll have to complete all the bonus minigames, in order, without fail. Full credit for this guide goes to PrettyGrumpyBear.

Night 1

You don’t actually have to do anything on this night – just play through it like you normally would. It’s interesting to note that Springtrap isn’t actually present on the first night, nor are any of the phantom animatronics. It’s there to get the player acquainted with the new location, so you can sit back and relax through this one.

Night 2

Switch to camera 8. You’ll see some posters on the wall on the left, one of which depicts Balloon Boy. Click on him to start the first minigame. Collect all of the balloons, but when the exit door appears do not go through it. Jump to the top right corner of the minigame and you’ll be able to move through the wall. Then you’ll fall through some weird-looking screens. When you stop falling, move right. Ignore the weird stuff you’ll see here and you’ll reach the last balloon. That ends the first minigame.

You’ll now be back in night 2. Switch to camera 7 and look for the arcade machine in the static. You’ll see four buttons on the left side (look closely). Click them in this order: top-left, bottom-left, top-right, bottom-right. You’ll now be in a minigame called “Mangle’s Quest”, in which you’ll play as Mangle collecting all the pieces of his body. Creepy, yes. Make sure you don’t let the child touch you, or you’ll lose and have to start this whole process over again. It’s worth noting that Mangle’s original purpose was to be a toy that kids could pull apart, which is probably why touching the child means death for him. Collect all your limbs, ignore the exit door again, and jump through the top-right wall. You’ll fall again, and when you reach the bottom you’ll need to move left. Jump up the balloon platforms, and when you reach the cake at the top the minigame will end.

Now go back to Balloon Boy’s minigame (the same way as before). Once you’ve got the balloons, jump out the top left like you did last time. You’ll fall onto more balloon platforms. Move right until you reach a platform with a crying child. As you approach, you’ll give the child some cake. This “saves” the child. Now go back and survive night 2.

Night 3

The next minigame is Chica’s. To enter it, you need to collect four skulls. They are located on the floor in camera 2, 3, and 4, and on the arcade machine in camera 6. In the minigame, Chica’s Party move right to the second screen. You don’t need to collect the cakes. Just drop down the hole to the room below. In that room, hop to the top left hand side, again through the wall, and you’ll find another crying child. “Save” them by approaching to give them some cake.

Go back and survive night 3, but pay attention to the minigame at the end. There’s a code you’ll need – 395248.

Night 4

This is where it starts to get ridiculously convoluted. In your office, notice the tiles on the wall below the window in your office. There’s a set of nine tiles (3 by 3) between the box of junk and the bin, directly in front of you. Imagine those tiles as a number pad, like you’d find on a phone, with the top left number being 1 and the bottom right being 9. Key in the code from the last minigame to start Golden Freddy’s minigame. Move to the right and drop off the edge, but just as you fall, try to move left. This will appear to cause your character to glitch, but just let it go. Move left to fall, and you’ll land in what looks like a duplicate of the last room. Now move two rooms to the right. This should lead you to the exact same room, only now it has an exit door. Ignore the exit door.

It gets tricky. Stand to the left of the bottom-left corner of the border, jump up, and again your character will glitch. Just before your character leaves the screen, jump left, and your character will be in the room to the left. Just as you enter that room, jump again and try to get on top of the border. This can be tricky, but you should be able to keep trying if you fall. Once you’re there, walk left until you’re directly above Sprintrap. Now jump up, and you should glitch into the room above. Land yourself on the ledge with Springtrap and walk past the children to the right wall. Jump, and you should glitch upwards again to above the border (honestly, it’s a miracle anybody was able to work this out). Stand directly above Springtrap and repeat the last step, only in this next room you’ll have to jump along the left wall instead of the right wall. Once you’re on top, jump off the right of the room and you should land in a new room with a crying child. Approach the child to “save” them with cake.

Notice, as this minigame starts, that Golden Freddy is standing with Springtrap. This indicates that Goldren Freddy and Springtrap were the original two animatronics, both of them being hybrid suits.

Night 5

There will be a Shadow Bonnie plushie on your desk. Click it, and you will enter the next minigame. It looks just like the last one, only now Shadow Bonnie has joined the fun. Press S a few times until you get to Balloon Boy’s minigame (Shadow Bonnie will appear to glitch like crazy). In Balloon Boy’s minigame, jump through the top left wall like you did previously and fall to the bottom of the room. Press S some more until you see a crying child. Give them cake to “save” them. This will send you back to night 5.

The last hidden minigame is reached through camera 3. Click on the picture of the marionette on the right to get to the Happiest Day minigame. Move right until you reach the room with greyscale kids – these are the kids you’ve saved. Approach the one on the right and he’ll get a mask. The children will disappear, leaving only their creepy little masks, and the minigame will be finished. Now go back and survive night 5.

The good ending isn’t actually that different from the bad one, but you do get a slightly different end screen… so there’s that, I guess.

Five Nights at Freddy’s and Difficulty in Horror Games

Horror

Survival horror is one of the hardest video game genres to really get right.  These games live and die by their atmosphere and anything that pulls the player out of the experience can instantly sour the entire game.  There are plenty of obvious points that immediately come to mind, like an imposing design for enemies and areas.  However, there is one element of horror design that I never see discussed despite being one of its most vital aspects and that is finding just the right level of difficulty.

For a horror game designer, the first instinct might be to stack on the threats, expecting the overwhelming challenges to terrify the player.  In practice, this is one of the fastest ways to pull the player out of the experience with far more frustration than fear.  Now matter how challenging a horror game can be, the simply fact remains that the player is never in any real danger.  The player needs enough time to become invested in their ingame survival on their own.  The more the player dies, the less he or she values survival in the game.  In that sense, a horror game actually needs to be fairly easy so that the player doesn’t become frustrated.  A proper horror game needs to know when not to kill the player.  At the same time, a horror game still needs to provide something for the player to be afraid of.  Striking that right balance is the grand challenge of building a proper horror game.  It has to deliver a constant sensation of vulnerability while having little actual threat.

The game that got me thinking about this was the recent indie hit Five Nights at Freddy’s.  For the titular five nights, the game is fairly easy with the haunted animatronics only being so aggressive, even on the final night, and giving the player a good amount of reaction time when they do reach your doorstep.  Even on the secret sixth night, it will usually only take a few attempts to beat it.  To offset the forgiving AI, the series has always been cryptic with its tutorials.  The player is given just enough information to understand the basics of play, but is still left to figure out the underlying mechanics on their own.

The sequel increases the difficulty with more animatronics and unique ways to keep each of them at bay, but offsets potential frustration by including hidden minigames that appear after a certain number of deaths.  Just when a player is at risk of rage-quitting, they are brought back in with an intriguing glimpse into the dark past surrounding the restaurant.  The latest game, Five Nights at Freddy’s 3, leans more towards the first game with a new set of rules for dealing with only a single animatronic and the most cryptic set of rules yet.  There are no post-death minigames, but they aren’t necessary in this title as the player isn’t as likely to be overwhelmed as in the second game.  Each game in the series demonstrates a fascinating approach to presenting the player to a panic-inducing challenge that doesn’t wear out its welcome.

Well, for the most part.  There is one point where the games ultimately fatigues its horror and that is with its custom night challenges.  These are included to give the games more replayability, but beating the game at maximum difficulty demands nothing less than absolute perfection.  While it does add more value to the title, playing either the first or second game to completion permanently  takes away all sense of terror.  Once you’ve played a game enough to see the lines of code at work behind the scenes, it’s hard to feel scared by it.  Fortunately, the third game avoids this by forsaking custom mode and instead adding replayability via multiple endings and easter eggs.  The series has been an intriguing new take on the survival horror genre with plenty of ups and downs to learn from.  With everything that creator Scott Cawthon has innovated on with these games, I think his take on creating a challenge in a horror game is the one most worth examining.