More Benefits That Will Make You Play More Video Games

More Benefits of Playing More Video Games

Video Games – just like any other medium of entertainment, the first years of our beloved video games weren’t a walk in the park; and, our childhoods were full of “stop playing and get to your room!”, “time to go to bed!”, “playing won’t do you any good!”, and a lot more. But now, as video games (and the industry, itself) continue to grow, we see a lot of people who has a video game with them, in one form or another. Be it a simple one-tap game or a mobile MOBA like Mobile Legends, people are playing video games, both male and female, young and old. Here’s another list of the benefits that video games can give us. Enjoy!

Improved Coordination

Just an example, Assassin's Creed
Just an example, Assassin’s Creed

Game: Action Games and Music/Rhythm Games

This must be the most noticeable improvement that gamers experience. If you’ve been playing video games, action and music/rhythm games, specifically, then I have a challenge for you. Have your friend throw a pillow or anything at you randomly and notice that your reaction will be quicker. Just. Like. Spiderman. Or, have your friend drop your phone near you and watch just how you instinctively reach out and catch it. How did you do this? Well, video games.

Since video games greatly help improve one’s hand-eye coordination, researchers are using video games in order to train surgeons. Their study shows that surgeons who’ve played video games for more than 3 hours a week have performed with 37 percent less error and 27 percent faster. Oh, they were performing laparoscopic surgery. Feel free to search about that procedure. I’m not really an expert in that field.

“The data is compelling — playing video games can make surgeons better. That’s not to say that reading and schoolwork are not important too.”, said Dr. Dan Jones, Chief of Minimally Invasive Surgery and Director of the Weight Loss Surgery Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Meaning, not because you’re a good gamer you’re good to become a surgeon. But, then again, who am I to stop you, go chase your dream if that what your heart desires.

Memory Booster

Oh yes, our friend plumber, Mario will help you...uhm...what was I saying again?
Oh yes, our friend plumber, Mario will help you…uhm…what was I saying again?

Game: 3D Games, apparently

Wait, what was I writing about? Yes, I am one of those people who easily forget what he was doing just a couple of minutes ago. And a research back in 2015 was conducted in order to show that videogames can improve one’s memory.

Craig Stark and Dane Clemenson of University of California, Irvine’s Center for the Neurobiology of Learning & Memory recruited college students who didn’t play video games that much and split them into two groups. One group is tasked to play two-dimensional games (Angry Birds) and three-dimensional games (Super Mario 3D World). And get this, the memory performance of those who played Super Mario 3D World increased by about 12 percent. Looks like playing before an exam helps, well, it did to me back then.

Reduce Stress and Depression

We Happy Few
We Happy Few

Game: Every game we’ve ever played and will play

It will all boil down to one – playing video games eases us, relieves us of the stress of the world we live on. A research was conducted by Patricia Areán, a UW Medicine researcher in psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and the study showed that 80 percent of the participants cope up with depression.

If you come to think of it, that’s the real point of video games – a means for us to have fun. Yes, games in the recent years were more emotional and more narrative but, in the end, we still have fun. The immersion that we engage ourselves in, the experience of living someone else’s life, and the people we interact with along the way – both virtual and real – show us that video games can be more than what they are, more than a means of entertainment.

Are there more to video games? Do you think video games can provide more benefits? Do you have any personal experience about the benefits of video games? Tell us in the comments section down below and let’s have a chat.

EarthBound Inspiration

earthbound

I know I shouldn’t be, but I’m kind of embarrassed to admit that my love of storytelling didn’t come from literature, or even film. Not originally, anyhow. It came from video games.

It bothers me to no end that I have to defend games as a medium. Truthfully, I don’t even like to call them games. I’d sooner call them interactive media or the like, but that just makes me sound like I’m calling porn “adult entertainment.”

I could go on forever about the medium. But I’m here to talk about one game in particular, and how it influenced me growing up.

It was called EarthBound

earthbound screenshot
Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14086391369/

A cult RPG on the Super Nintendo about a thirteen-year-old kid in contemporary America (called “Eagleland” in the game) alongside his best friends, saving the world from cosmic horrors. It’s one of the goofiest, trippiest games to come out of Japan at the time, and that’s saying something.

In a time when most RPGs were sword-and-sorcery fantasy, along comes this game where the hero uses yo-yos and baseball bats, orders pizza from payphones to heal, uses the ATM to get money, sleeps in hotels, travels via buses and bicycles, gets homesick, goes backstage of concerts, and fights hippies, taxicabs, pedophiles, ramblin’ mushrooms, wild ducks, possessed tents, and more. All done to a jazzy, ‘60s-’70s Western pop music inspired soundtrack. You can practically sing the Beatles lyrics along with some of the game’s soundtrack.

All this plus themes of courage and friendship and adventure. It was about leaving home and seeing the world–and not your usual fare of dark forests and magic castles, but of suburbia and big cities and wintery private schools and beachside vacation destinations. Ness, the hero, came from a small house in a suburb with his family. He had a baseball cap and a scruffy dog. He was me. And he had best friends that he saw the world with. This was my On the Road in the 1990s.

EarthBound was the first game that I’d played that was so chock-full of text that I might as well have been reading a pile of books

EarthboundScreen2
Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14273041415/

It had a quirky, but heartfelt story that I fell in love with. And from then on, I needed my games to draw me in with the story and the setting and the characters–a fact that continues to this day. “Fun” is secondary to aesthetic and narrative. I want art and I want story. Games got me drawing and they got me reading and they inspired me to create my own stories.

When I was in grade, oh, four or five, I did one of those reading evaluation things that teachers give you. They told me I read on a college-grade level. I was a quiet kid who had little use for books, but I read more than most book-lovers. After all, the games I loved were filled with words, back before everything was voice-acted. My reading skills came from games.

And EarthBound was the start

Earthbound Screenshot 3
Image Credit: https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/14273039595/

It made me want to run away and have adventures. To write screenplays about psychics and mad scientists and aliens invading the suburbs. I wanted to build a house in the woods and listen to the Beatles on the radio all day long. I can think of so many beautiful, iconic moments in this goofy kids’ game that I could make this post go on and on and on.

Ultimately, EarthBound gave my mind a fictional wanderlust. Even though it was a game, it made me appreciate the beauty of the world outside my house. I look at the stars or smell the earth after it rains and I remember this dreamy feeling of wanting to put on my trusty baseball cap, leave home and save the world. Games like EarthBound provided this imaginary escape–the same kind books like Huckleberry Finn would do for readers. It was freedom. And that freedom is why I play games.