Worm.is Cheats: Tips & Strategy Guide (Wormis cheats)

Worm.is

You can still feel the craze of the .io games (Agario, Slitherio and so on) and these types of games are far from offering all they can and new titles, even though highly similar to the originals, are bringing new things and new gameplay mechanics to make them even better and more addictive. Such is the case of Worm.is: The Game, a title I just stumbled upon on Steam and I became addicted to.

After endless hours of playing and leveling up and trying out the different game modes and strategies, I am here to share with you some Worm.is cheats: a complete set of tips and tricks for a complete strategy guide. Hopefully this will improve your game at least a little bit!

1. Run in circles
You can’t die if you hit your own body and others can’t touch it unless they want to become instant snake food, so if you want to increase your chances of staying alive, learn to move in circles or always close to your body. This way, whenever a threat is nearby, you can easily go to the safety of your own body and avoid it – even more, increase the chances of your attacker hitting you.

2. Follow the crowded areas
In crowded areas, chances of snakes getting destroyed and becoming snake food are higher than anywhere else. That’s why it is important to try and lurk near populated areas, while doing your best to stay safe – there’s no shame in rushing to eat snake pieces even if you didn’t destroy the snake. It’s all for getting bigger and crowded areas are the best spots to do that!

3.Use the super speed
Right clicking gives you super speed for as long as you keep the mouse button pressed, but you also lose some of your worm’s length while doing it, so only use the super speed when it’s really necessary, for example when close to an enemy worm and when speeding up a bit will put you in front of it and turn it into worm food. Learn how the super speed works, because where you are fast controlling your worm isn’t that easy anymore.

4. Complete the daily quests
For easy money or even better, items and chests, the best thing you have to do is to complete the daily quests. Some are more difficult than others, but you should make sure that you complete them all on a daily basis to make your worm the best out there.

5. Protect the egg!
If you are playing the catch the egg game mode, you can be extremely helpful for your squad mates if you protect eggs that are dropped. You need to be fairly large in order to do this properly (and, of course, carry an egg yourself). When these conditions are met, simply go to a dropped egg and circle around it until one of your teammates comes and gets it – if you circle around it, none of the enemy worms will be able to get it!

6. Win the hunger games
It’s really fun to play and win the Hunger Games mode in Wormis: you don’t even have to take part into the battle and even though that takes away a bit of the fun, it helps you win. So simply stay away from the crowds in this game mode and eat as many bits as possible, getting as big as possible without risking it all. Then start playing once there are 3-4 worms left in the game and you can be the winner – easily!

7. Collect the coins
Coins are extremely important in the game because you use them to buy equipment that increases your stats and give you advantages in the game, so make sure that you collect all the coins that you see when playing. The more you play, the more coins you will get – and even more, the more you stay alive in each game type, the more coins you get!

These would be for now our Wormis tips and cheats. Do you have extra advice for people playing the game? Let us know by commenting below.

Stellaris Guide: How to Win Wars

Stellaris

Stellaris Guide

Stellaris is that type of game that shows no mercy if you make even the smallest mistake and if you’ve played the game at least a little bit, you know that there are a lot of mistakes you can make during a playthrough. The biggest unknown in most cases and one of the biggest challenges in the game is going to war and even more so winning wars.

I remember that I was eager to declare my first war during my first playthrough. I had no real idea what to expect or how to do it, so I just maxed out my fleet and declared war to the closest empire. I went straight to their home base laughing at their ships that were attacking my mining outposts in solar systems that I had no troops in. Just a few moments later, after their entire fleet decided to respond to my futile attempts to destroy their planet, I was left with just three ships and it was game over for me. War is difficult and winning them takes a lot more than just clicking some buttons. I am here to share with you my complete guide to winning wars in Stellaris, because you probably need some extra advice.

1. The way you start the game is extremely important! I’ve already shared some valuable tips & tricks on how to start a game, but the short version would be this: research Colony Ships ASAP, Maximize your Minerals & Energy production, Survey as many systems as possible and rush to build your first 4 colonies. I don’t really recommend attacking anybody before you have at least four planets and spaceports (for the extra fleet size).

2. During this time and your rapid expansion, it’s extremely important to focus on researching advances for your military ships. Focus on a single type of weapon and armor and hope that your nearby species are not strong against these. You can even go to slavery in order to increase your outputs (if you get such bonuses from the governments you’ve chosen) and you can also switch to +30% society research in your policies to quickly get colony ships and solve the alien language quests faster.

3. Hoard minerals and make sure that you have enough to rebuild your entire fleet (most likely, it won’t be needed, but having this will surely help). Make sure that you upgrade your corvettes to the latest technology and that they are not weak against the enemy you’re facing. Have in mind that if you have higher numbers, you can still get destroyed by an enemy fleet that has defensive bonuses against your weapons and/or offensive bonuses against your armor/shields.

Look for an alien race that has less power than you do. They are the best choice when it comes to winning wars and if you have such a race, you’re almost guaranteed a win if you do things the right way. You can also destroy empires that are similarly powered, but it might be a bit more difficult. So Golden Rule of Thumb: go for the weak ones first!

4. Prepare your defenses. This step might not be needed, but it’s best to be prepared. Check out the routes leading to your planets and the most likely directions from which the enemy might come (easier in Warp and Hyperdrive, a bit more difficult to guess with Wormholes). Build Defensive Outposts there: they won’t destroy AI fleets in most occasions, but they will give you enough time to come and defend your Planets and, most importantly, destroy the enemy fleet. Usually, the one who wins the first major battle will win the war.

Alternately, prepare your armies. This is also optional, as your main goal in wars is to get the empires become your vassals and make them part of your empire after the waiting period (usually 10 years). If you won’t do this, although this is the best method, you need to complicate things by training armies to attack their planets.

5. Declare the war and instantly go on the offensive. Pause the game and prepare your moves. The AI will react almost instantly, but if you have the upper hand, you will win. Try to go for their fleet and destroy it – at the same time making sure that you rebuild the Corvettes you are losing – use all Starports to do that to have them ready faster. Ideally, you should draw the enemy in near a Defensive Outposts, but usually it won’t happen. Just charge them and make sure you win your first conflict. Retreat, repair, refill and attack again: this always gives you the upper hand.

If you have this option, start destroying their mining facilities. Go for minerals and energy only to make it impossible for them to rebuild their fleet. Finally, if they don’t come up with a peace offer, start the diplomacy event yourself and ask them to surrender.

I prefer to go the Vassals route and make them part of the empire later on. Enslave all the Pops (you get no penalties this way and there are no risks) and quickly build up a new fleet. Rinse and repeat, always making sure that your Corvettes (I usually prefer them for attacking) are updated with the latest weapons and tech and that they actually have weapons and armor that are strong against the race you’re fighting.

This would be it. Wars in Stellaris are really difficult, but with a bit of planning and strategy, you will easily win them all and become the ruler of the universe!

Did you play Stellaris? What do you think about this game?

Doom 2016 Cheats, God Mode Code

Now that we’ve already fixed all the Doom 2016 crashes and problems and we can fully focus on enjoying this amazing game, some gamers might want an easy go through it and would like to get some cheats as they are, when it comes to games at least, the best way to make life easier. And that’s exactly what we have to share with you in this article: all the Doom 2016 cheats and codes – including the infamous god mode.

We’ll start with the Doom cheat codes:

First, you will have to activate the console by pressing Ctrl + Alt + Tilde key on your keyboard (~). Then, write any of the commands below to get the indicated effect (note that these won’t work on Nightmare mode):

iddqd – enables GOD Mode (but you still get damage from hazards)
ida – gives you all suit mod slots and the suit mods themselves
idkfa – fully upgrades Health, Armor, Weapon Mods and Ammo Capacity, gives all Weapons and Suit Slots & Mods
idfa – fully upgrades Armor, Health, and Ammo Capacity
idka – gives you all Weapon Mods, Weapons, and also fully upgrades Weapon Mods
iddt – reveals all unexplored areas and items
idgk – enemies become immune to all normal weapons, and you can only kill demons with Glory Kills

This would be it in terms of Doom 2016 cheats, but I am sure that it’s more than enough to make your progress through the game a lot easier. Just remember that these codes won’t work in the Nightmare mode.

Best Stellaris government types (and Guide to All Governments)

Stellaris government types

Stellaris

Stellaris is an epic game that offers, before adding any mods, 15 different government types to choose from and just as many advanced government forms to advance to. It might seem – and it is, up to a point – overwhelming to deal with so many options, so I’ve decided to write this complete guide to Stellaris government types and share with you which is, in my opinion, the best government type in the game.

It’s worth noting that some of these government forms are weak in certain situations but could actually be pretty strong in the right circumstances, while some weak government types can be combined with powerful Ethics in order to change the tides. But we’ll keep these advanced options and strategies away right now and focus on the basics: which is the best government type in Stellaris and a quick guide to all other types of government in the game with a few words on their strengths and weaknesses. So let’s get started with…

Best Stellaris Government

Despotic Hegemony

This is by far my favorite and I clearly consider it one of the best – if not the best – in the game. It gives you +5% research speed and +10 Survey speed (double these amounts for its advanced form, Neural Network Administration) and allows you to build one Elite Assault Army per ruler. Researching faster puts you ahead of other civilizations, while the extra Survey speed allows you to explore the galaxy faster and find the best planets for your colonies before anybody else does. The Elite Army that you can build is also very powerful for conquering planets, but you should play this for the first two bonuses it offers. A great option for early-mid game domination that turns into a flawless victory in late-game situations.

The other options

Military Dictatorship

Another government I like because it offers great advantages up to the late game stages: +20% Naval Capacity and -5% Navy Upkeep (double in its advanced form), plus a not-that useful in the long run Oversized Military Ship per ruler (+50% armor, HP and shields). However, the first bonuses give you the chance to become a very powerful empire in mid-game and late game situations especially from the sheer numbers of your fleet. And since a large fleet is always welcome, this is a good option for most attack-minded people out there.

Military Junta

Offering -10% Ship Cost and -25% Ship upgrade cost (double in its advanced form), this is a good option for creating a dominant empire early on. However, I don’t think these are really bonuses to love especially in the later game phases when you will most likely have a ton of resources anyway. But if you want to try and rush attacks early on, this one might be a good choice.

Direct Democracy

+2 Core Planet Limit (doubles when you advance) is all that you get from this form of Government and it’s pretty useful in early game situations, especially if you want to get rid of the early Sectors that make things more complicated instead of simplifying them. This could indeed offer a nice bonus to take advantage of and build your race into the dominant one in the galaxy. I am actually considering starting a game with this form of government and switching to something else in later game stages, but it still doesn’t sound as fun as my Despotic Hegemony.

Plutocratic Oligarchy

Many people like this form of government, but I don’t think it’s that good, really. It gives you +5% (+10% in its advanced form) yields in Mineral and Energy, but in the long run not some bonuses to really write home about. They are indeed useful early on for the extra minerals and energy that allow you to build your empire slightly faster, but there are better options out there!

Theocratic Republic

This one’s a better version of the Direct Democracy government as it offers the +2 Core Planet limit and -10% Ethic Divergence (both doubling when it advances), but it is paired with a way weaker ethic in my opinion, so it’s not as powerful in the long run. Choosing between these two is pretty difficult, though so probably each could make for an interesting game.

Military Republic

I believe that all Military types of governments have the potential to be very useful. This particular one gives you -10% Army and Naval Upkeep and +5% War Happiness (all double when it advances to Martial Democracy). This could be interesting to play especially in late-game situations, and the War Happiness boost is really welcome. You should give this a try if you have the chance.

Despotic Empire

An interesting mix because of an extremely useful bonus (-15% Building cost which doubles when you advance it) as well as an intriguing second bonus: +10% Slave Mineral and Food Tile Yield (also doubles when you advance). It also offers one oversized Military Station per ruler (+50% armor, HP and shields) but that’s not as impressive as it sounds. I haven’t played or relied too much on slavery, to be honest in order to be able to fully assess the situation, but I’d say that even though a good option, it’s not really good in the long run.

Indirect Democracy

This might be decent if you’re running a Leader-focused game, but usually not that good in my opinion. It gives you +1 Leader Starting Skill Level and -10% Leader Recruitment Cost (doubles in both areas when you advance it) but in the late game when most of the surveying has been done and it’s easier to reach the level cap with your Leaders, it doesn’t seem that useful anymore. Better than other options, though!

Science Directorate

One pretty good bonus (+1 Research Alternative) and one not-so-great (+1 Leader Capacity) make this not one of my favorites, nor the best in the game. It’s true that the extra technology alternative is extremely useful especially early on – since you could, in theory, be really unlucky and be delayed to getting the Colonization options, but it loses all purpose later on in the game. You also don’t really need the extra leader, so I’d say pass to this one.

Moral Democracy

If you want your people to be the hippies of the galaxy, this is the choice you should make since you get +10% Happiness (double when you advance). While happiness is definitely important in large – and even small – empires, there are more fun ways to play the game. If you want the easy way out, you could try this one and hope that your pacifist traits are not ignored.

Divine Mandate

+50 Slavery Tolerance and -15% Resettle cost (all doubling when you advance), combined with an actually interesting unique building (Grand Mausoleum – offering -10% Ethic Divergence) make up for a pretty interesting, but highly situational government type. Maybe it would deserve to be higher on the list because of the Slavery Tolerance bonus – I told you already that I am not really using the slavery option, so I don’t really know all the implications. The Resettle costs are pretty useless though, so I really would not rush to give this one a try.

Enlightened Monarchy

Despite its huge offering in terms of bonuses: -25% Edict Cost, +25% Edict Duration, +1 Core Planet Limit (all doubling in its advanced state), PLUS the option to build a Royal Garden per ruler (offering +10% happiness), I consider this a weak or, at best, highly situational type of government. The problem is that you still need a lot of influence for the edicts – an influence that will have to be spent on other more important things like growing your civilization and recruiting new leaders and I always had Influence hoarding problems.

Peaceful Bureaucracy

This one gives you +1 Leader Pool Choices, +1 Empire Leader Capacity, and -15% Leader Recruitment costs (all bonuses double when you advance to Irenic Protectorate). Not very useful because I doubt that you will really need the extra leader even late in the game. The other two bonuses are slightly better, but I would never consider this form of government as a solid choice for my game.

Theocratic Oligarchy

I think that this is by far the weakest type of government in the game, offering -10% Ethic divergence and -15% Leader recruitment cost. No, thanks!

These would be the Stellaris government types and you have them listed from the best to the worst (in my opinion). Do you agree with my Stellaris rankings? Which is your favorite government type in the game?

Best Stellaris Tips, Tricks & Strategies to Help You Win Games

Stellaris

Stellaris is indeed a stellar game! The depth of this game is incredible and the AI is so ruthless that even on Normal levels regular players can have a lot of trouble: in my case, during my first playthough – the tutorial – I was absolutely crushed and most of it was caused by the fact that I had no idea what I was doing. In the end, managing an entire interplanetary civilization is not an easy task! However, I kept learning and finding new things and tweaking during my other playthroughs and I still believe that I am not an expert when it comes to this game. But I do have a solid understanding of at least some of its mechanics and I am here to share that with you in this article where I give you my best Stellar tips and tricks in a complete strategy guide that will help you win all your games.

It won’t be easy and you should also make sure you check out my previous article where I detail the starting strategies you should always apply as they’re not completely covered by this guide. But do read on – and prepare for a long and hopefully helpful read in my guide. I give you Vgamerz’ best Stellaris tips and tricks below!

1. Colonies are extremely important
I can’t really stress just how important the colonies are. Of course, having great options varies from game to game, but even if you don’t really have a lot in terms of offers, you should still set up colonies: 3-4 in early to mid-game should be your goal, because the sooner you establish the colonies, the sooner you can build them up and turn them into real powerhouses for your empire and, most importantly, have them add to the number of ships you can control. So set up your colonies, make sure that you care for their food needs at first and slowly build them for the future.

When it comes to Colonies, take future upgrades into consideration and choose your building placements accordingly. You will know these by playing the game multiple times, but the best thing to start with is to choose a starting location for your colonist ship (or whatever it’s called in the game) near tiles with energy or minerals in order to get the adjacency bonuses later on in the game. You could go even a step further and specialize your colonies: have a mining one and an energy-producing one.

2. Never stop surveying
I mentioned this in my starting tips article, but it has to be said here as well: survey as soon as the game starts and keep on doing it until you have the entire universe figured out. Remember that early on you can (and should) explore new solar systems with your Corvettes: do it in order to avoid losing your Science Ship in unexpected encounters. Do all the research that pops up, but take care with anomalies that have a high failure rate: it’s better to just leave them for later as you can lose them or even lose your scientist, which is extremely bad.

3. What resources are extremely important
Of course, all resources are extremely important, but Minerals are the most important early in the game – so make sure you focus on producing these first. Influence is also extremely important for the long run and the thing I usually failed at hoarding: declare rivals and use the Capital to get as much influence as possible. And, most important, don’t waste it for relocating Pops or other useless things. Influence is the most difficult to get!

4. Have your warships ready for any type of enemy
I would suggest specializing and focusing research on weapon advances in a couple of areas only, but your ship designs should be as varied as possible. I would recommend specializing your warships – and doing it heavily – but try to do that based on the enemies you’ve picked (or pick an enemy who is weak to your current starship setup). There are mainly three types of weapons: lasers, missiles and projectile weapons and each has its weakness. In my opinion, the best to focus on early are the Missiles because the Point Defenses counter for them is unlocked later on in the game and gives you a slight advantage early on. However, you should have warship designs for each category of weapon (and ready to defend against any type of enemy weapon) for when war starts. This is why it’s extremely important to know your enemy and know what kind of technology they use in order to be able to counter it. If you don’t do this, you will lose all wars!

5. Build your Frontier Outposts where they matter
Frontier Outposts are extremely expensive in terms of Influence costs, so make sure that you build them where they matter and where you need them the most: usually the best choice being somewhere near a good planet you can colonize. Don’t overuse them and don’t put them to waste: you’re only given a chance with their placement, so make it count. For example, I placed one of mine too far away from the planet I wanted to colonize and by the time I had enough Influence to build a new one, a different race had already conquered those lands, so I was left with a bit of space that offered very little in return – especially when combined with the huge costs of building the Frontier Outposts!

6. Don’t rush to go to war
I did and I lost: it was during my tutorial phase, where I though I’d be able to obliterate my Reptilian neighbors who were half my size. I jumped with my fleet to attack their home base and get things sorted out ASAP, and so I did: my fleet was highly unprepared for their type of fleet and after our first battle, I was down to just 4 ships left while they had an amazing 10-12 still alive. There’s little sense in saying that it was game over for me very soon after.

So when you go to war, make sure you’re prepared: having an extremely solid fleet is extremely important. A strategy that’s worth trying is to divide it in two fleets in order to easily take out their resource producing improvements in different Solar Systems. We’ll talk more in depth about winning wars in a different article, but until then, you should still know that you have to be prepared: get ready to defend your planets and don’t hesitate to build Defense Stations or platforms, because they can really save the day. Upgrade all your ships before attacking and don’t rush to destroy their planets: take their resources first, destroy their Constructor ships and try to take out their fleet. Also, have enough Minerals ready to quickly replenish your lost warships, otherwise you will soon be overpowered. War is extremely complicated and you should only start one when you are ready for it.

7. Don’t underestimate Fallen Empires
These annoying and highly overpowered empires are the things you don’t want to see anywhere near your borders. If you meet them, though, try to stay on their good side for as long as possible. If they’re far away and especially if there are other civilizations between you and them, you can ignore them usually (and I would even suggest declaring them your Rivals for the extra Influence gains) but otherwise stay on their “liked civilizations” list at all costs!

8. Wormhole travel is the best
The best form of travel for your spaceships, in my opinion, is by wormholes because that’s the fastest way to travel. The game does list it as advanced, which might scare you off a little bit, but trust me and try it, then master it. Just make sure that you build your wormhole stations in areas that you can defend with relative ease (areas where your enemy is most unlikely to pop) and you should be just fine. Being quick from one point to another and being able to get from point A to point B in just two jumps gives you a massive advantage, so my suggestion is to always go for Wormhole travel.

These would be, for now, my top tips and tricks for Stellaris. I will definitely add more in the future, so make sure to check back. Also, if you have tips and tricks for fellow players that you think will be useful, don’t hesitate to let us know by leaving a comment below.

Stellaris Cheat Codes & Console Commands

Stellaris has been launched and we’re obsessed with this game and if you’re reading this, chances are that you’re on the same boat. However, this is a brutally difficult game and even though we’ve shared with you some tips and tricks to get a head start in the game and we’re planning to share even more strategies in the future, you might just want at a given point to take the easy route and cheat. If that’s the case, I am here to share with you a bunch of Stellaris cheat codes that will make your life a lot easier in the game – but might take away some of the fun too.

In order to enter and use any of the Stellaris cheat codes listed below, you must activate the console by pressing the tilde key (`) – it’s usually the key next to the 1 key on your keyboard. Once activated, type in any of the codes below to get the indicated result (note that this doesn’t work if you’re playing in Irnoman Mode):

Cash #### – adds the indicated amount of Minerals (so if you type Cash 5000 you get 5000 minerals)

Invincible – your fleet takes no damage

Research_Technologies – instantly research all technologies

AI – Toggles AI (write the command again in order to reactivate AI)

Society #### – Adds the indicated amount to your society

Survey – Instantly survey all planets

Influence #### – Adds the indicated amount of influence

Debug_Yesmen – All AI players will accept any demands you make

Instant_Build – Instantly completes current build projects

Finish_Research – Instantly completes all current research projects

This is it for now! We’ll make sure to update this list with more Stellaris cheat codes if we find any extra.

Stellaris Tips and Tricks for Starting Your Game Flawlessly

Stellaris is more than a grand strategy game: it’s game which, thanks to its customization options and massive scale, is absolutely unbelievable. If you add some roleplay to the mix as well, even when playing alone, you’ll get even more from it. But starting is always difficult and it’s easy to make some small, stupid mistakes, that will cost you in the long run. Therefore, I have decided to write this guide and share with you some Stellaris tips and tricks on how to start each game in order to prepare for interplanetary domination early on and in order to increase your chances of defeating all alien scum you’ll encounter.

There are tons of strategies that work and a ton that might make things difficult to you – and it all gets even more complicated based on the traits of the races you create and play as, so what suits my play style might not necessarily suit yours. However, I still think that this is worth reading, so do give it a chance if you want to get a head start early on and get the most out of Stellaris as soon as you start a new game. Read this and stay tuned with us as even more Stellaris content is coming! (UPDATE: Read our best tips & tricks article here – but make sure you do after reading this one, as these tips here are not covered again in the new article!)

1. Start surveying as fast as possible and explore as much as possible: send your first Science Ship to survey your solar system (this is the first thing that you should do), then make sure you keep it hopping from solar system to solar system surveying everything. Have in mind that if you meet anomalies that have a success rate lower than 30 percent, it’s best to leave it be for the time being as you run the risk of losing your Scientist.

A trick to make things faster and not risk losing your Science Ship to enemies waiting in a new solar system is to send your military ships explore the new galaxies as well. They can’t survey them, but they can explore them and see if there’s any threat waiting. Do so while your Science ship is surveying your starting system in order to win time and get an advantage in deciding what route to follow.

2. Activate Details Mapmode – even if you play on a Tiny map, things will start getting too complicated shortly. Activate this function by clicking the button at the bottom of the screen and you’ll have a detailed overview of resources in each galaxy and habitable planets. It will help you a lot in the long run so learn to play with this option on!

3. Go for energy and minerals first: these are the most important resources throughout the game, but especially early on: have your construction ship focus on Mineral and Energy-producing planets and build on your own planet buildings that improve one or the other (usually, it’ better to focus on energy since chances of finding resources in the galaxy are actually higher). Remember, though, that during early game stages, Minerals are vital and probably the most important type of resource. Don’t build any research-related buildings and even ignore research bonuses that you find on other planets and focus on getting all the minerals and energy first.

4. Colonize your first planet ASAP! As soon as you find a habitable planet, start the colonization process: the longer you wait, the further you’ll be left behind in the race to conquer the galaxy. Even if the energy will drop in the red for a while, you shouldn’t worry: it’s temporary and you shouldn’t be hoarding energy either way (I usually hit my maximum storage anyway in a few hours of play time – and you will do so most likely if you manage things properly). Then rush to get to five planets as fast as possible and build Starports everywhere in order to get the maximum fleet advantage. It’s also what most of the other species’ will do, so you have to keep up!

5. Start thinking about specialization: building awesome ships is exactly what you need in order to rule the galaxy. Always focus on researching better technology for your ships, and try to specialize them on just a couple of things as you won’t have the time to be an ace in every weapon type, for example. It would help if you knew what to prepare for (by analyzing what types of ships the other races have), but even if you don’t, just make your pick and stick to it. And it’s better to have 2-3 techs to focus on than playing all your cards on one in case you are extremely unlucky and you meet a race that is completely resistant to your tech advances.

6. Build Frontier Outposts only when needed
Frontier Outposts are extremely useful if you find a system that’s not within your borders, but you need the resources there. Ideally, you will place it in a solar system or nearby one that you will colonize later, in order to be able to bring that system within your race’s borders and get to decommission the outpost in order to use that energy elsewhere. However, make sure that the gains (in energy and minerals, mostly) are worth it because building the Frontier Outposts is extremely expensive and there’s also a maintenance fee.

(Note: In an early version of this guide, I claimed that you need to build FO’s to colonize planets – which is something I was certain you have to do until I received some comments here. It was either that this was changed by a later update – which is highly improbable – or I just got things wrong and therefore all my Stellaris games had an extra challenge as I only colonized planets after building an outpost. This might actually work nicely as a challenge for yourself if you need an extra one as it does make the game a lot more interesting.)

7. Declare rivals
Influence is extremely important in the game and there are not many ways to gain it. So it’s a good idea to declare rivals with other players or Fallen Empires if you meet them in order to get a boost in Influence which will come extremely handy later on (especially when your leaders start leaving this world)

These would by my tips and tricks for starting the game. There’s a lot depth to this game, but having these basic things in mind will ensure that you have a great start and a bright future ahead of you.

Other tips regarding what to do when starting a new Stellaris game? Let us know by commenting below and remember to check back soon for even more tips and tricks for this game!

Jalopy Guide: How to Climb Up a Hill

Hill

For a car simulator, you would expect they’d offer you a car that’s able to climb up any hill and drive on any road that awaits for you, but that is unfortunately not the case. I got extremely frustrated after starting the game when I found out that my poor Laika doesn’t have enough power to go up the hill. Fortunately, after going completely crazy (or almost), I found out two different strategies that work and help you drive up a hill in Jalopy and I have a guide to share for you here.

I would personally suggest the first strategy because it’s going to work in 100% of the cases:

– Reverse! As strange as that might sound, if you simply turn your Laika around and go through all the trouble of driving in reverse mode, it will magically have the required power to climb up a hill. I never had any problems with this, so it’s always going to work!

– Get some speed! Start driving further away from the hill and get to maximum speed. On some occasions (probably depending on the type of hill you have to drive), starting to climb it at maximum speed gives you enough power to just make it. However, this is not guaranteed to work, so you should still try my first suggested method.

Finally, in order to be able to climb up any hill in the game without resorting to these tricks, you should upgrade your engine: more power means that you will be able to go up. However, it’s expensive and not a viable option early on in the game, so use the methods above to keep on driving.

How to Fix Battleborn Crashes, Low FPS, Freezes and Other Problems

The extremely fun Battleborn has been released by Gearbox Software and we can finally fully enjoy the game. Well, at least most of us because a few unfortunate gamers are running into different – but not generally widespread problems with the game: Battleborn performance issues and low FPS seem to be the number one issue right now, with even high end computers getting very low frames per second, but there are also various Battleborn crashes and freezes that we’ll try to fix in this article.

So if you have any sort of problem playing the game or getting it to start, read on all the advice here: some solution might be listed for a specific problem, but might still work for your problem as well, so it’s worth giving them all a try. These being said, let’s see how to fix Battleborn crashes, freezes and low FPS problems.

Before anything else, let’s go with the basics: make sure that your computer meets the minimum system requirements and, just to see if there are any improvements, try to tune down the visual settings. Also, make sure that your graphics card drivers are updated: this is especially important for those running an AMD card: upgrade to hotfix drivers 16.4.2 which have just been released. You can also download the latest nVidia drivers here.

However, as strange as this might sound, some people are actually getting better results in terms of FPS and overall game performance by using older drivers or at least not the latest drivers from nVidia. So if you’re running on the latest drivers or the update to the latest doesn’t fix any performance problems, try rolling back to older drivers.

Enable vsync

Enabling vsyng (yes, I know that we usually try to disable it) seems to strangely fix the game, especially crashes or freezes before the game starts. In order to enable Vsync, go here: Documents – My Games – Battleborn – PoplarGame – Config – PoplarEngine.ini (open this file with a text editor) and set UseVsync=True

Other tweaks for better FPS

Open the PoplarEngine.ini file (as instructed above) and find the [SystemSettings] area: you have way more options for tweaking there. Set to False the following: DynamicLights, DynamicShadows, LightEnvironmentShadows, Motion Blur and Ambientocclusion. You can try setting the “False” command instead of “True” anywhere here to deactivate certain features and see which work better for you, but the ones I recommended should be just enough.

Also, set ShadowQuality=0 and ShadowFilterQuality=0

Finally, set Frameratelocking=0 (this doesn’t lock the framerate, but for some reason it offers better overall performance than locking it to any value).

This is it for now in terms of fixes and suggestions for stuff to do to fully experience the game, but we’ll make sure to update this article if we find anything extra. If you manage to find other ways to improve the FPS of Battleborn or other fixes, let us know by commenting below.

All the Hearthstone Nerfs Coming in Year of the Kraken and the Impact They’ll Have

Hearthstone Nerfs

Hearthstone Nerfs

With the Year of the Kraken just around the corner, Hearthstone will be seeing plenty of big changes with the release of the Whispers of the Old Gods expansion, the introduction of Standard mode, and a number of nerfs being applied to older cards that are packing a bit too much punch.  Sadly, there were no buffs announced for the various underpowered cards that exist.  They also didn’t nerf Dr. Boom, the one card that needs to be nerfed more than any other regardless of the fact that he won’t be legal in Standard mode.  With that said, let’s go through all of the changes that are being made to numerous Classic and one Basic card and examine how these changes will effect Hearthstone Nerfs ‘s meta.

AncientOfLoreNerf

Druid is getting hit the hardest with three staple cards being nerfed.  First is Ancient of Lore, a card that has been a mandatory late-game minion for any Druid deck, losing half of its draw potential.  He can only draw one card now, but he can still heal for as much with his alternate effect.  That might sound like a small change, but it’s seriously going to cut into the Ancient’s usefulness as that card draw is entirely what made him so potent to begin with.  While he’s not unusable in this new state, he’ll definitely be replaced with cards like Azure Drake and Nourish in a lot of builds.

KotGNerf

From the mandatory late game Druid card to the mandatory midgame card, Keeper of the Grove is keeping his powerful Choose One effect, but is losing 2 points of health.  Keeper will probably see a good amount of play his Choose One effect is still extremely strong, but his weak stat line means that he offers little presence on the board and other 4 drops are going to look a lot more appealing.  While Druid is losing some of its best utility cards, it’s mainly being done because these specific cards are the strongest in their mana range and nerfing them demands a greater variety in deck building.  Speaking of which…

ForceOfNatureNerf

Try to pretend you didn’t see this one coming.  Force of Nature and its insanely potent combo plays have dominanted the Druid meta since the beginning.  No other decks besides Combo Druid have ever had a chance to enter the meta as their all immediately forced out by the one that tops them all.  Combining this with Savage Roar is enough to slash through just shy of half of your opponent’s health even if your board is completely empty.  Cast Innervate to enable a second Roar, and that’s more than two thirds of a player’s max health gone in a single turn.  Obviously, something had to be done and Force of Nature has been almost entirely reworked.  Now, the Treants it summons will just be simple 2/2 minions wih no special effect to them.  Combo Druid won’t be going away entirely, as Savage Roar is going by completely unchanged with this balance patch.  It’s just that you’ll be able to see the combo coming from now on instead of your opponent seemingly pulling it out of thin air.

HMNerf

Here’s one I never saw coming.  Hunter’s Mark, a card that sees little play to begin with, is having it’s mana cost increased from 0 to 1.  There are a couple of possible reasons for this change, first of which being a concern over Hunter having a 0 cost spell as well as Lock and Load, which is a pretty niche card anyway.  The other possibility is this is a preemptive nerf being made with an expectation for Control Hunters to have a sudden rise in the new meta.  Maybe this will prove to be a vital change with the next expansion, maybe it was a waste of time.

MoDNerf

Here’s another nerf that seems more preemptive than anything else. Master of Disguise doesn’t see much play, but there is a great deal of potency when combined with the right cards.  Casting stealth on Chromaggus, Troggzor, or Kel’Thuzad and letting them sit in the corner while their powerful effects go off forever can be massive.  WotOG is bound to have even more fearsome options, so shutting down this potential exploit before it takes off is a smart move.  It’s just a shame that Master of Disguise has missed the time in the spotlight before it even came to him (yeah, Master of Disguise is a male tauren, can’t you tell?).

BFNerf

Blade Flurry and Tinker’s Sharpsword Oil came together for Rogue’s most potent combo.  It seems a little strange to nerf Flurry this heavily as Sharpsword won’t be Standard legal.  However, there is a bigger concern at hand with Flurry that made this change necessary.  Flurry was an incredibly potent card and, as a result, Blizzard had to design new cards around it and be careful not to introduce overpowered combos.  This change will open up greater possibilities in the future, but it has rendered Flurry almost unplayable.  Maybe a new combo will arise at some point later on that makes it potent again, but it’s not going to see play anytime soon.

BGHNerf

Next to Force of Nature, this is the second biggest change the nerfs are making.  Big Game Hunter was probably the biggest tempo swing in the game, taking out the biggest minions in the game with ease while also putting a body on the board.  Sure, 4/2 isn’t a great body, but the amount of control he gives you over the game makes him the best epic-level card in Hearthstone nerfs.  There was a lot of talk in the community about nerf BGH as he makes most of the high cost minions unplayable.  The increase in cost does help those cards enter the meta, but don’t expect BGH to completely die out.  While several decks will drop him in favor of hard-removal spells like Polymorph and Shadow Word: Death, he’ll still be valuable to a few specific builds.  Druid will still want to have BGH handy as that class has always had hard-removal as a weak point and BGH will still be its best option.

IBONerf

Silence is one of the most powerful utility effects in the game and Ironbeak Owl has always been the go-to card for it in any deck.  Have a taunt minion you need to get around to deal your lethal combo?  Get the owl.  Is there an enemy minion with a powerful effect that you can’t outright kill in time?  Get the owl.  Has your biggest minion been debuffed and rendered useless?  Get the owl.  Silence is incredibly useful, but it also restricts the meta pretty heavily as many cards can be rendered unplayable by its very existence.  The increase in mana cost makes Ironbeak substantially worse as its stat line has gone from tolerable to horrid.  It may still be worthwhile just for the silence effect, but trading it in for Spellbreaker.

KJNerf

Knife Juggler has had the nerf hammer hanging over his head for the longest time and it’s finally hit.  However, a reduction in attack isn’t going to discourage players from including him in their decks as it’s the knifes that really matter rather than the Juggler himself.  Although random, the damage he can deal can strongly cement your control over the game and the premium stat line was just a great bonus on top of that.  This nerf has simply made Knife Juggler one of the best 2 drops in the game rather than simply the best.  Don’t disenchant you Jugglers as they’ll still be viable inclusions in plenty of decks.

LGNerf

Leper Gnome and his horrific hugs have been center stage in every aggro deck to date, but this nerf may mark the end of a face-smashing era.  With one less attack, not only will aggro decks have less punch to rush down the opponent, he also can’t trade up on the majority of 2 drops.  This also indirectly nerfs Mekgineer Thermaplugg, but nobody had any plans for him to begin with.  Leper Gnome may still have enough damage in him to be playable in aggro decks, but control definitely looks like the way to go with the upcoming meta shift.

AGNerf

Oh, I am very happy about this one.  Prior to these Hearthstone Nerfs being announced, if there was one card I would have just removed from Hearthstone entirely, it was Arcane Golem.  By design, it was a card that could only work in decks of pure aggression and going for the face from start to turn 5 lethal.  Well, this nerf basically has removed Arcane Golem from the game as it is now 100% useless.  Dancing Swords and Ogre Brute only see occasional play in Arena at best and Arcane Golem is basically a substantially worse version of those cards.  Giving your opponent a mana crystal is a huge disadvantage that will usually lose you the game.  Golem was able to get away with it before because it was used in decks that killed the opponent so quickly that they never had a chance to use that bonus mana.  A moderately cheap 4/4, on the other hand, is not that big of a deal.  Good riddance to bad rubbish, I say.

MGNerf

Molten Giant has always been the best giant for constructed play as it’s the easiest to play for free, even if you need to take some risks for it.  Given the fact that players could summon two of these on the same turn for little to no mana and this nerf was warranted when its only threat, Big Game Hunter, is also taking a price hike.  Granted, it’s still possible to play it for free, but you’re going to have to take a huge risk for it.  One way or another, you’re going to have to pay the price to get this 8/8 on the board.  This may lead some decks to swap in other giants in Molten’s place, but there also an interesting buff happening here.  The Paladin spell Holy Wrath has always worked best with Molten Giant because of its massive cost (the spell even name-drops Molten in its flavor text) and this nerf actually makes the combination better.  With all the high-cost minions being introduced with the next expansion and this change to Molten, Holy Wrath Paladin may actually go from a hilarious gimmick deck to a legitimate, high-level strategy.

That does it for all of the Hearthstone Nerfs that will be seeing in the next content update.  It’s worth noting that Blizzard normally offers a full dust refund for disenchanting cards for a limited time after they’re nerfed, so hang onto your copies until that happens.  Once the nerf hammer drops, you should definitely burn Arcane Golem, Blade Flurry, and Force of Nature, but keep Knife Juggler.  The rest will depend on what kinds of decks you’re planning to play with.  Which cards are you glad to see go?  Which are you sad to lose?

Leave a comment about Hearthstone Nerfs below and let us know what you think.  The Year of the Kraken begins on April 26th.